First, interview someone in their 70s or 80s – someone who likes to talk – and ask them questions about their mass media experiences during the last century

COM-130 – The Rock and Roll Edition
 
Interview two people:
 
First, interview someone in their 70s or 80s – someone who likes to talk – and ask them questions about their mass media experiences during the last century (1930s and on).
 
Notice that no apostrophe is used for the decades (70s, 30s, etc.). See your Writing/Style Guide!
 
If you don’t have a family member or other acquaintance in this age bracket, there are plenty of retirement communities/nursing homes in the SNHU/Manchester area filled who people who would love to talk to you.
 
 
 
Next, interview someone aged 48-58. It can even be one of your parents!
 
These interviews must be done in person (best way) or on the phone, Face Time or Skype. Do not do this via text or email. Have an actual conversation with the interviewee.
 
You can use the questions below as a starting point. Some questions apply to certain age groups better than others. These are guidelines, not absolute requirements. Google artists to make sure you spell names correctly.
 
 
Sound recording (records, tapes, CD, mp3):

What records did you listen to? Who was your favorite recording star?
Who were the teen idols back then?
What kind of record player did you have? Was it your own or shared with family?
Was there any kind of music you weren’t supposed to listen to? Why?
Were you allowed to play music whenever you wanted or were there parental limitations?
How much did a record cost?
Where did you buy them?
When did you start buying CDs instead? Did you ever have cassette or 8-track?
How did you find out about the artists you listened to?

 
 
Radio:

What do you remember about your experiences with radio?
What kinds of programs did you listen to? (Entertainment, music, talk, etc.)
When were they on?
Why did you like them?
Do you remember anything about the early radio commercials?
Do you remember any public concern about radio commercials?
Do you remember any educational radio programs?
What if any technical problems did you experience with your radio?
Do you have some specific memories (good or bad) about listening to the radio?
What was it like when FM radio became available? Ask the younger person if they ever listened to music on AM radio.

 
 
Television/Cable:

What was it like when TV became available?
Where did you watch your first TV programs and what was the experience like?
How much did your family’s first TV cost (older person)?
What was reception like?
What was a typical family viewing session like?
How did TV change home life?
What do you remember about the corporate sponsors of TV shows?
Do you remember the quiz show scandals?
What do you remember about the first 30-seocnd TV commercials?
How does your television experiences in the 1950s compare with your TV experiences now?
Did you decide to get cable or satellite TV? What factors went into this decision?
Did you or your siblings have a TV in the bedroom (younger person)?
Do either of your interviewees use streaming services (Netflix)
Have either of them gone “off grid?” Do they know what that term means?

 
 
Movies:

What were your first movie-going experiences like and how are they different from today?
What were some of your favorite films growing up and why?
Do you remember anything about Al Jolson and the first talkies (older person)?
Do you remember the introduction of new technologies like Dolby sound or “Sensurround?”
What was your first “R-rated” movie experience?
Do you remember the excitement surrounding the release of Gone With the Wind (older person)?
Do you remember anything about the release of Star Wars (younger person)?
Were there films your parents forbid you to see? What were they and why were you not allowed to see them?
What films were the most influential for you?

 
 
 
News:
Older Person: How did they learn about/follow the assignation of John F. Kennedy? How about the first person on the moon?
 
Younger Person: How did they learn about and follow the 9/11 attacks? How about the Boston Marathon bombing?
 
Both: What is their primary source of news today? What news outlets do they trust the most and least? Why?
 
 
Writing/Formatting This Paper
 
Please follow these guidelines – attention to detail matters!
 

Read and follow your Writing/Style Guide
Make sure this is a Microsoft Word document (.docx). No other format accepted.
Your paper should be double-spaced, with one inch margins
Use Arial 11-point type. DO not let MS Word switch you to Calibri!
Use just a single space after a period, not two
Name the file “Your Last Name”-Com130-Lab3
Insert a page break between the two interviews
Put your name, the name and age of your interview participant, and your relationship to the interviewees at the top of the page.
Group each interview participant’s answers under the assignments’ four categories: Sound recording, Radio, Television/Cable, Movies, and news.
Write at least two paragraphs for each category
You may paraphrase your interviewee. If there’s a great quote, try using it word-for-word.
Only include information that seems the most poignant or interesting. For example, if your participant didn’t say anything interesting or worthwhile about some of the questions for radio, skip that category, and include additional information from another category they elaborated on.
Bold or italicize the most poignant/interesting responses – something really worth reading.
The paper should be approximately 700-1,200 words (this is a guideline, not a rule)
Proofread it carefully. Follow the Writing/Style Guide. Is it grammatically correct?
Submit as a Microsoft Word document on Brightspace

 
 
Adapted from Jimmie Reeves, Texas Tech University. Thank you to Jerri Clayton and Andrea Bard of SNHU for their adaption of this assignment.
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