Discussion: Common Chronic Diseases

Discussion: Common Chronic Diseases

Discussion: Common Chronic Diseases

Discussion: Common Chronic Diseases

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Week 4 discussion This week’s content addressed common chronic diseases. Please review the case study below and answer the following questions: A sixty-year-old baker presents to your clinic, complaining of increasing shortness of breath and nonproductive cough over the last month. She feels like she can’t do as much activity as she used to do without becoming tired. She even has to sleep upright in her recliner at night to be able to breathe comfortably. She denies any chest pain, nausea, or sweating. Her past medical history is significant for high blood pressure and coronary artery disease. She had a hysterectomy in her 40s for heavy vaginal bleeding. She is married and is retiring from the local bakery soon. She denies any tobacco, alcohol, or drug use. Her mother died of a stroke, and her father died from prostate cancer. She denies any recent upper respiratory illness, and she has had no other symptoms. On examination, she is in no acute distress. Her blood pressure is 160/100, and her pulse is 100. She is afebrile, and her respiratory rate is 16. With auscultation, she has distant air sounds and she has late inspiratory crackles in both lower lobes. On cardiac examination, the S1 and S2 are distant and an S3 is heard over the apex. What is the chief complaint? Based on the subjective and objective information provided what are your 3 top differential diagnosis listing the presumptive final diagnosis first? What treatment plan would you consider utilizing current evidence based practice guidelines? Submission Details: Post your response to the Discussion Area by the due date assigned. Respond to at least two posts by the end of the week.

You may find it hard to tell others that you have a chronic illness. You may worry that they will not want to know about it or that they will judge you. You may feel embarrassed about your illness. These are normal feelings. Thinking about telling people can be harder than actually telling them.

People will react in different ways. They may be:

  • Surprised.
  • Nervous. Some people might not know what to say, or they might worry they will say the wrong thing. Let them know that there is no right way to react and no perfect thing to say.
  • Helpful. They know someone else with the same illness so they are familiar with what is going on with you.

You may look and feel fine most of the time. But at some point, you may feel ill or have less energy. You may not be able to work as hard, or you may need to take breaks for self-care. When this happens, you want people to know about your illness so they understand what is going on.

Tell people about your illness to keep you safe. If you have a medical emergency, you want people to step in and help. For example:

  • If you have epilepsy, your coworkers should know what to do if you have a seizure.
  • If you have diabetes, they should know what the symptoms of low blood sugar are and what to do.

Let People Help you

There may be people in your life who want to help you take care of yourself. Let your loved ones and friends know how they can help you. Sometimes all you need is someone to talk to.

You may not always want people’s help. You might not want their advice. Tell them as much as you feel comfortable. Ask them to respect your privacy if you don’t want to talk about it.

If you attend a support group, you may want to take family members, friends or others along. This can help them learn more about your illness and how to support you.

If you are involved in an online discussion group, you might want to show family or friends some of the postings to help them learn more.

If you live alone and do not know where to find support:

  • Ask your provider for ideas about where you can find support.
  • See if there is an agency where you can volunteer. Many health agencies rely on volunteers. For example, if you have cancer, you may be able to volunteer at the American Cancer Society.
  • Find out if there are talks or classes about your illness in your area. Some hospitals and clinics may offer these. This can be a good way to meet others with the same illness.

Get Help With Your Daily Tasks

You may need help with your self-care tasks, getting to appointments, shopping, or household chores. Keep a list of people who you can ask for help. Learn to be comfortable accepting help when it is offered. Many people are happy to help and are glad to be asked.

If you do not know someone who can help you, ask your provider or social worker about different services that may be available in your area. You may be able to get meals delivered to your home, help from a home health aide, or other services.

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